Australia votes ‘yes’ to same sex marriage
MCD Staff

MCD Staff

Australia, or more appropriately, Australians, have had their say, with 61.6 per cent of the nation voting Yes to legalizing same-sex marriage.

The final count was 7.8 million responses in support of same-sex marriage, and 4.9 million against.

Australian statistician David Kalisch said the final number of responses was 12,727,920 people, representing 79 per cent of eligible Australians.

Follow our live blog for all the reaction to the same-sex marriage survey result.
“This is outstanding for a voluntary survey and well above other voluntary surveys conducted around the world,” he said.

“It shows how important this issue is to many Australians.”

Mr Kalisch noted participation was strong across every state and territory except in the Northern Territory, where only 58.4 per cent of eligible people responded.

Christian groups have responded. The Marriage Alliance group issued a statement saying:

“Despite the huge media bias against the “No” campaign, and widespread attacks on supporters of true marriage, millions of Australians voted against radically changing one of our key social institutions.

“However, it wasn’t enough to get us over the line — with the final result being 61.6% to 38.4% in favour of “Yes”.

While this is obviously disappointing, we must shift our attention immediately to the challenge ahead.

“Throughout the campaign, supporters of same-sex marriage — including many leading politicians — claimed there would no adverse consequences to redefining marriage.

“It is now vital that we hold them to their word.”

FamilyVoice Australia has called on parliamentarians to enact genuine and comprehensive protections for freedom of conscience and religion in any same-sex marriage law, following today’s result from the postal survey.

“The Yes campaign has repeatedly promised that legalising same-sex marriage will not compromise freedom of conscience and religion. They must now deliver on this promise,” said National Director, Ashley Saunders.

“Legislators must grasp that a person’s beliefs, whether religious or not, inform every part of their life in their family, community and workplace. Protections must not be limited to ministers of religion performing wedding ceremonies but should encompass every Australian in any walk of life who cannot, in good conscience, support same-sex marriage.”