Iceland close to becoming first country where no Down’s Syndrome children are born
Independent

Independent

On average, just one or two children with Down’s syndrome are born in Iceland each year

Iceland is close to becoming the first country where no-one gives birth to a child with Down’s syndrome.

Pre-natal tests were introduced in the early 2000s, and the vast majority who receive a positive test have terminated their pregnancy.

While the tests are optional, all expectant mothers are informed about their availability, and up to 85 per cent choose to take it.

It’s called the Combination Test, and uses ultrasound and blood tests – as well as factoring in the mother’s age.

This determines whether the foetus will have a chromosome abnormality, the most common of which results in Down’s syndrome.

The law in Iceland allows for abortion after 16 weeks if the foetus has a deformity, and Down’s syndrome is included in this category.

On average, just one or two children with Down’s syndrome are born in Iceland each year. Sometimes, this is as a result of an inaccurate test.

Article link: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/iceland-downs-syndrome-no-children-born-first-country-world-screening-a7895996.html

Image courtesy Erin Ryan, Wikipedia Commons